2004:0230 - CROSSE, Cork

NMI Burial Excavation Records

County: Cork Site name: CROSSE

Sites and Monuments Record No.: SMR 74:37 Licence number: 01E0984

Author: Hilary Kelleher, c/o Planning Department, Cork City Council, City Hall, Cork.

Site type: Urban, post-medieval

ITM: E 567070m, N 571623m

Latitude, Longitude (decimal degrees): 51.895789, -8.478457

Monitoring of service trenches for this phase of the Main Drainage Scheme began in November 2001 and was completed in 2004. To date, several archaeological features have been identified, all of which date to the post-medieval period (Excavations 2002, No. 270; Excavations 2003, No. 210).

Archaeological features were identified in the following areas: west of the medieval city, where suburbs were developed on reclaimed marshes from the end of the 18th century onwards (i.e. Western Road, Ferry Walk, Mardyke Walk, Thomas Davis Bridge and Dyke Parade); east of the medieval city, where suburbs were developed on reclaimed river channels and marshes from the late 17th century onwards (i.e. South Mall, Oliver Plunkett Street, Grand Parade and Parnell Place).

Monitoring has provided information on the stratigraphy significant to the interpretation of the development of the city and an overview of the extent of destruction of archaeological stratigraphy and features within the historic city during the post-medieval period.

The final phase of the monitoring programme was undertaken in August 2004, concentrating on groundworks at Crosse's Green Quay, Crosse's Green and French's Quay. The works involved the laying of sewer pipes and storm drainpipes in trenches measuring 0.6m in depth and 0.5m in width. Although excavations were within the vicinity of the medieval Dominican Priory of St Mary's of the Isle, due to the limited impact of the development no features of archaeological significance were uncovered. The stratigraphy within the trenches consisted of road surfacing 0.2m in depth overlying a black/brown stony soil with fragments of red brick measuring 0.4m in depth.